IPA Spotlight On … Eric Hansen, Chair, AICPA

Name: Eric Hansen

Title: Chair

Eric Hansen

Eric Hansen

Firm: AICPA

Accomplishments:

  • COO of BKD CPAs & Advisors, oversees firmwide operations and acts as liaison between BKD’s national office and its four regions.
  •  Became AICPA chair Feb. 1 and will serve in that capacity until May 2019.
  • An Eagle Scout, he extolled the virtues of preparation and anticipation in his acceptance speech following his election as chair.
  • Was part of the leadership team responsible for the launch the Association of International Certified Professional Accountants (Association), which represents 650,000 members and students worldwide.

What are your top goals as chair?

The way I see it, there are three actions we must take today to be ready for tomorrow. First, we must harness technology to create more value for clients and businesses by elevating quality in existing services and taking the lead in emerging areas. This includes a focus on auditing in the future, and new and emerging attest services. Second, we must embrace our role in a hyper-connected, global society, extending our influence to protect the public interest amid increasing complexity. Creating the Association was a huge step toward a platform that helps us pursue this goal. And third, we must invest in our most important asset – our people – by evolving skills and competencies, advancing learning opportunities and cultivating future leaders.

What more should be done to advance CPAs’ understanding and implementation of AI, blockchain and data analytics?

One area of focus for the Association is integrating data analytics into the auditing process to enhance quality and maintain the relevance of this foundational CPA service. The AICPA and Rutgers Business School are partnering on a research initiative to demonstrate how this integration of data analytics can lead to auditing advancements. We also must focus on developing the higher-order competencies. To that end, we launched a new version of the Uniform CPA Exam last year that places a greater emphasis on cognitive skills such as critical thinking and analytical ability. My advice here is simple. Every member of our profession needs to take personal responsibility for the development of the skills they need to succeed in the future. Don’t wait for it to come your way.

As a former member of AICPA Task Force on the Future of Learning, what changes do you foresee in the AICPA’s educational offerings?

Through the Future of Learning initiative, we are transforming the way learning is delivered with innovative technologies that blend text, audio, graphics, video, 3-D animation and interactivity to enhance learning. Social learning, virtual group study and interactive exercises increase engagement with hands-on application. We’re also making use of new learning models, launching a new bite-sized learning series called Human Intelligence, which is focused on the skills and competencies needed for success in the future. And then there is our leadership development. The AICPA Leadership Academy was established to address succession planning and to increase diversity and inclusion in leadership. Beyond that, we are expanding access to competency-enhancing tools and resources through the Association. Our research on the future of finance will be used to update the competency framework and syllabus for CGMA.

How do you envision the scope and reach of professional accountancy expanding in an increasingly connected world?

It is essential for today’s leaders to look beyond definitions, demographics and geographic dimensions that once constrained the scope and reach of professional accountancy. I’m a CGMA, as well as a CPA, so I’m aware of the need to serve clients and the public interest with a holistic, global focus. Public accounting’s focus on auditing and taxes remains a critical part of the business world. And the value management accounting brings to the corporate finance function is equally important. Both disciplines are likely to grow in importance as our global society becomes both more immediate and more complex. Our new Association, formed with the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants, is all about meeting the challenges of our increasingly hyper-connected world.

Final thoughts?

You and I see the rapid pace of change – in the world of accounting and all around us. What’s needed to meet the challenge such change brings is a bias for action and the courage to be bold. As my fellow Missourian, and former U.S. President Harry Truman said, “Progress occurs when courageous, skillful leaders seize the opportunity to change things for the better.” At the AICPA, I’m blessed to be surrounded by so many skilled, courageous leaders who share that bias for action. Working together, we’ll make the CPA profession even more relevant in the future than it is today.

Do you know someone else who would make a good Spotlight? Contact Christina Camara.