IPA Spotlight On … Chad Anschuetz, Doeren Mayhew

Name: Chad Anschuetz

Title: Managing shareholder and chair

Firm: Troy, Mich.-based Doeren Mayhew (FY16 net revenue of $73.7 million)

Accomplishments:

Chad Anschuetz

Chad Anschuetz

  • Recently elected as managing shareholder and chair of the firm, ranked No. 58 on the 2017 IPA 100 list.
  • Instrumental in developing the firm’s culture, infrastructure and growth strategies as a member of the firm’s management committee and chair of the human resources committee.
  • Guided more than 50 clients in successfully buying or selling their companies.
  • Assisted in the collaborative development of the firm’s community outreach program, “Difference,” which fosters giving back to our local communities through volunteering efforts.

You’ve just started your term as managing shareholder on Oct. 1, replacing Mark Crawford, who’s been in the top job since 1995. Are there any special challenges in replacing someone who has been with the firm for four decades?

As with any leadership change, overcoming employee and client uncertainty is always a big challenge. Yet, when you’re replacing someone who has been doing it for two-plus decades it’s much more intensified. Over the next year, a main agenda item will be reassuring our employees and clients that the firm’s founding principles, culture and service model won’t change, but by constantly improving, it will get better. I’ve been fortunate enough to have worked closely with Mark throughout my 26-year career with Doeren Mayhew. As part of our firm’s succession plan, my active role in the firm’s management committee and continued mentorship from Mark will help create a smooth transition.

Doeren Mayhew has locations in four states and Zürich. Does the firm have plans to expand its footprint, either in the U.S. or internationally?

Doeren Mayhew’s long-term vision has always been to create a triangle effect linking our efforts in the Midwest, Southwest and the Southeast. Both acquisitive and organic growth is always in the plans for Doeren Mayhew, especially if the right opportunity presents itself, at the right time — like Zürich. Our international arm, Moore Stephens Doeren Mayhew, had been working diligently overseas to continue to find ways to better service our global clients. The merger with Emerson & Partner U.S. Tax GmbH allowed us to do just that by providing key leadership roles locally for our growing European client base. Our strategic plan includes expansion focused on service and industry resources in our existing markets, and less emphasis on geographic expansion.

You’ve said that the firm’s client service model has helped it become a great firm. Can you tell us what that looks like, and how can the firm work at developing innovative ways to add value for clients?

Doeren Mayhew’s most valuable asset – its clients – is the driving factor of our firm’s success. Our firm places an immense amount of focus on fostering their success. We go beyond what clients might expect, leveraging our entrepreneurial mindset to provide insightful solutions while introducing opportunities for growth. Delivering on our promise of providing insight, oversight and foresight requires the firm to continuously evaluate where we are able to add value to our clients. Whether that’s through the use of artificial intelligence in engagements or expanding service line expertise, I’m confident that our firm’s talented professionals have what it takes to bring about the change and continue to add value to our clients and thrive as a firm.

Firms named IPA ‘Best of the Best’ firms are successful, financially and operationally. How is the firm preparing to stay ahead of the technological changes (AI etc.) that may transform the profession?

Continued innovation will be key for Doeren Mayhew to stay ahead of the technology-induced paradigm shift happening in the accounting industry and remain a ‘Best of the Best’ firm. Doeren Mayhew has formed a committee dedicated to developing and implementing changes into our firm’s engagement processes. We are looking at the use of artificial intelligence in our audit, tax, forensic and litigation support engagements as an opportunity to increase efficiencies and drive new value to our clients, which is always our goal. More important, we are closely tracking how regulatory standards will modify current guidance and monitoring mechanisms for this new technology to allow us to continue delivering our service offerings with integrity.

Final thoughts?

Technology is dramatically reshaping our industry. Artificial intelligence is hardly a fad. A successful firm will embrace the opportunity to streamline operations and redeploy staff’s efforts on delivering creative, value-added client services. The firm I started with back in 1991 is not the same firm today. And, to continue this progression we will need to keep imagining what the firm will look like in five, 10 and even 15 years from now to prosper long term.