Settlement Reached in Andersen Tax Trademark Dispute in California

Andersen Tax has settled a lawsuit with MoHala Enterprises, a Monterey, Calif., limited liability company, which was accused of six counts of state and federal trademark infringement, counterfeiting and unfair competition.

The suit, filed March 13 in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, said MoHala worked in concert with French businessman Stéphane Laffont-Réveilhac, who identified himself as global MP of Arthur Andersen in a March 1 LinkedIn post and contended that the firm had been “reconstituted.” Also named in the suit are Veronique Martinez and Arthur Andersen & Co., a French company that is similar to an LLC in the U.S.

According to the settlement, MoHala was part of a network of individuals and entities recruited by Laffont-Réveilhac and Martinez to become affiliates of Arthur Andersen & Co.

Andersen Tax announced Wednesday in a release that the specific terms are confidential, but “MoHala Enterprises d/b/a Sundial Consulting has agreed never to use the terms ‘Andersen’ or ‘Arthur Andersen’ to promote its professional services consultancy, and has withdrawn its membership as an affiliate of the French society calling itself ‘Arthur Andersen & Co.’ Sundial Consulting will also be dissolving Arthur Andersen LLP, a California limited liability partnership it previously formed for purposes of serving as the U.S. member and affiliate of this French society.”

In attempting to reach MoHala’s attorneys, IPA reached out to Oscar Alcantara, Andersen Tax managing director and associate counsel, who says in an email, “Our adversary has not designated counsel in the U.S. case.”

Andersen Tax says it owns multiple trademark registrations incorporating the name Andersen for tax and business consultation services around the world.

Mark Vorsatz, Andersen Tax CEO, told IPA last month that Laffont-Réveilhac met with an Andersen Tax managing director in 2015 and proposed a “sale of defendants’ brand portfolio” in exchange for “an extraordinarily large sum of money.”

“We have no interest in paying them anything for anything,” Vorsatz said at the time, adding that Andersen Tax owns the trademark in over 90 counties, including the U.S. and the European Union. Laffont-Réveilhac has twice been denied use of the trademark in court and Andersen Tax is intent on using all legal avenues to end the matter, Vorsatz said.

Laffont-Réveilhac has continued to post on LinkedIn, most recently outlining “Arthur Andersen’s European Strategy.” He wrote April 12 that “we strive for a rapid increase in power, while taking all the time necessary for a rigourous selection of our future affiliated members for a network of first quality.”

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